Friday, January 27, 2017

Travis Richardson appointed to 2nd Subcircuit vacancy

The Illinois Supreme Court today appointed Travis Richardson to the Second Subcircuit vacancy just created by the retirement of Judge John D. Turner, Jr.

The appointment is effective February 14 and will expire on December 3, 2018.

Richardson was, until recently, a partner in the firm of Richardson & Mackoff (his partner, Myron F. Mackoff, left the firm in December to take up duties as a Circuit Court judge from the 8th Subcircuit). Richardson was a candidate for a 2nd Subcircuit vacancy in the 2016 Primary, garnering the Tribune's endorsement and a "Well Qualified" rating from the Chicago Council of Lawyers in the course of his campaign.

A graduate of the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Michigan Law School, according to his firm biography, Richardson has been licensed as an attorney in Illinois since 1997.

10 comments:

Anonymous said...

Guess he couldn't get an appointment in the subcircuit he actually lives in!

Anonymous said...

The ARDC reports that Mr. Richardson has a Public Record of Discipline and Pending Proceedings. Not at all Judge material in my mind. But I suppose we should be grateful that although he might not reside in the 2nd subcircuit (according to the BGA), he does at least he reside in Cook County, unlike a recent Supreme Court appointee.

Jack Leyhane said...

Anon 1/28 @ 11:34 -- This is old news. Mr. Richardson's 2nd subcircuit residency was challenged in the 2016 primary. The question was resolved in his favor.

Anon 1/29 @ 8:51 -- Also old news. The CBA evaluation expressly noted the prior censure order (for failure to secure a written contingent fee contract -- anyone can look it up) and found that it was not a bar to a qualified rating. The CCL gave a Well Qualified rating to Mr. Richardson. As for the other 'shot' about another judge -- have you ever moved in your life, Anon? People do. Presumably, unless this is only a temporary appointment and the appointee has no intention to seek the seat, appropriate steps to establish residency will be taken -- if, indeed, this hasn't happened already.

Anonymous said...

Well-deserved appointment to an obviously qualified individual. Last year only 4 candidates had the honor of a Tribune endorsement and Council of Lawyers rating of Well-Qualified or higher, including Richardson. Of course, the sad thing is that only one (Judge Jerry Esrig) won his election. Then again, Esrig was on a "second chance" appointment from the Supreme Court when he won on his second election attempt. This was a solid appointment by the Supreme Court. Good luck to you, Mr. Richardson.

Anonymous said...

Anon 1/28 and 1/29 are, this anon suspects, envious judicial wannabes who could not make it successfully through the evaluation process themselves. So now they throw rocks at someone who did and hide their hands. Par for the course, I suppose.

Anonymous said...

As you know a judicial candidate must apply/run in the county within which he/she resides not where they practice.

Anonymous said...

CONGRATULATIONS TO TRAVIS RICHARDSON.
RICHARDSON HAS GREAT BAR RATINGS UNLIKE THE PERSON THAT WON IN MARCH OF 2016 IN THE SECOND SUBCIRCUIT.

Anonymous said...


HOW MANY VACANCIES IN THE 2ND SUBCIRCUIT?

THERE ARE PEOPLE MOVING INTO THE 2ND SUBCIRCUIT TO RUN FOR JUDGE.
IS THAT LEGAL?

Jack Leyhane said...

ANON 1/30 10:38 p.m. -- Short answer: YES.

Judicial candidates must be residents of the unit from which they seek election before they may cause their names to appear on the ballot for the primary election. That means a person can move in and establish residency and run even if he or she hadn't lived in the subcircuit previously.

It is different -- or it might be different -- with regard to the Supreme Court's power of appointment.

I know that two of the three Cook County Supreme Court justices have been fairly insistent (and fairly consistent as far as I know) that all persons appointed reside in the county or subcircuit where the vacancy exists.

But I don't know that this is required. There is an argument to be made that the judicial appointment power conferred on the Supreme Court by the Illinois Constitution would prevail over any statute which attempts to impose such a limitation (and there has been at least one such statute, applicable to subcircuits). So -- to respond to a couple of comments, not all of which have seen the light of day -- I don't know that there would be anything illegal, immoral or fattening in appointing a resident of, say, Will County---just to pick one at random, you understand---to a Cook County vacancy. That hypothetical appointee would, however, have to establish residency in Cook County in order to run for that seat in the primary.

What am I missing?

Anonymous said...

Jack,
Thank you for your answer.